Adequate academic progress is a necessity for many students to maintain financial aid and scholarships. Substance Abuse and its effects on Academic Progress can be tragic for students that rely on financial aid or scholarships.  The pressure to maintain satisfactory grades can be extremely overwhelming and burdening.

There are many factors that cast a student as a successful student. These factors include a minimum grade point average, (which varies per university and program) and completing a certain amount of courses.

Many students rely on drugs and alcohol as a way to cope with academic stress. Infact, about 20 percent of college students meet the criteria for an alcohol use disorder. Although many students turn to drugs and alcohol, addiction and substance abuse can quickly derail any sort of academic progress.

Sadly, many students struggling with addiction and Substance Abuse and its effects on Academic Progress causes students to suffer silently and do not seek help for fear that their academics will deteriorate even more. Many students fear that if they go into treatment, their scholarships or financial aid will be taken away. However, addiction and substance abuse can have far worse consequences.

According to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, about 1,825 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor-vehicle crashes.

Fortunately, many treatment programs work with students to help them not only recover but also reach their academic goals. Many treatment programs and sober livings value education as part of the recovery process. So, if you or a loved one is struggling with addiction or substance abuse while attending school, please know that recovery and academic success can happen simultaneously! One should never have to choose between school and well being.

Contact Us at The Nook Sober Living and one of our staff members will explain to you how our program has been designed to be perfectly compatible with college students who are getting sober.

Call Us 24/7 at:

(888) 711-4278